04 June 2013

Timeline of British Neurology (1835-1987)

1835                Hughlings Jackson is born.

1837                Henry Charlton Bastian is born.

1843                David Ferrier is born.

1845                Thomas Barlow is born.

1845                William Gowers is born.

1845                Fletcher Beach is born.

1847                Byrom Bramwell is born.

1852                Judson Sykes Bury is born.

1854                Charles Edward Beevor is born.

1856                Charles Alfred Ballance is born.

1857                Victor Horsley is born.

1858                Leonard Guthrie is born.

1860                The National Hospital for the Paralyzed and Epileptic is founded in a small house in Queen Square, Bloomsbury (discussion here).

1861                Henry Head is born.

1862                Hughlings Jackson joins the staff at the National Hospital.

1864                William Aldren Turner is born.

1867                Joseph Shaw Bolton is born.

1867                Julius Alhaus, a German physician, opens the London Infirmary for Epilepsy and Paralysis

1868                Henry Charlton Bastian is elected Assistant Physician to the National Hospital for the Paralyzed and Epileptic.

1869                Henry Charlton Bastian publishes a paper on aphasia titled, On the Various Forms of Loss of Speech in Cerebral Disease.

1869                Hugh Kerr Anderson is born.

1870                Bertram Louis Abrahams is born.

1871                Edward Farquhar Buzzard is born.

1871                James Crichton-Browne founds the West Riding Lunatic Asylum Medical Reports.

1872                London Infirmary for Epilepsy and Paralysis changes its name to Maida Vale Hospital for Diseases of the Nervous System               

1873                Edwin Bramwell is born.

1873                Walter Morley Fletcher is born.

1875                American Neurological Association is founded.

1875                Arthur Stanley Barnes is born (biography here).

1875                Henry Charlton Bastian publishes Paralysis from Brain Disease.

1876                David Ferrier publishes The Functions of the Brain.

1876                The West Riding Lunatic Asylum Medical Reports cease publication.

1876                Maida Vale Hospital changes its name to Hospital for Epilepsy and Paralysis and other Diseases of the Nervous System

1876                Mind – a Journal of Philosophy begins.

1877                Samuel Alexander Kinnier Wilson is born.

1877                Francis Carmichael Purser is born.

1877                Frederick Lucien Golla is born.

1878                Brain – a Journal of Neurology begins.

1878                Thomas Grainger Stewart is born.

1878                Dr Henry Tibbits founds The West End Hospital for Diseases of the Nervous System, Paralysis, and Epilepsy.

1879                George Hall is born.

1880                The Ophthalmological Society of the United Kingdom is founded.

1880                Henry Charlton Bastian publishes The Brain as an Organ of the Mind, which is translated into French and German.

1881                Byrom Bramwell publishes Diseases of the Spinal Cord, which is subsequently translated into French, German, and Russian.

1882                Thomas Graham Brown is born.

1882                Donald Elms Core is born.

1884                Godwin Greenfield is born (biography here).

1885                Anthony Feiling is born.

1885                Francis Walshe is born.

1886                The Idiots Act is passed into law.

1886                William John Adie is born.

1886                Henry Charlton Bastian publishes Paralyses, Cerebral, Bulbar, and Spinal.

1886                The Neurological Society of London is founded.

1887                Henry Charlton Bastian occupies the Chair of Medicine at University College Hospital.

1888                George Riddoch is born.

1889                David Ferrier is appointed to the Chair of Neuropathology – a position specifically created for him.

1889                William Gifford Wyllie is born.

1889                Ronald Grey Gordon is born.

1890                The Lunacy Act is passed into law.

1890                Charles Symonds is born (biography here).

1890                Philip Cloake is born.

1891                Frederick Nattrass is born.

1892                William Osler publishes The Principles and Practice of Medicine, which for the first time includes the changes that have been introduced into medicine by bacteriology.

1892                William Aldren Turner is appointed Assistant to David Ferrier in the King’s College Neuropathological Laboratory.

1893                Henry Charlton Bastian publishes Various Forms of Hysterical or Functional Paralysis.

1893                James Ross and Judson Sykes Bury publish Peripheral Neuritis.

1895                Dorothy Russell is born.

1895                Thomas Barlow occupies the Holme chair of Clinical Medicine at University College London.

1895                Fletcher Beach publishes Treatment and Education of Mentally Feeble Children.

1896                The Belgian Neurological Society is founded.

1898                Charles Beevor publishes a Handbook on Diseases of the Nervous System.

1899                The Neurological Society of Paris is founded.

1899                William Aldren Turner is appointed Assistant Physician at King’s College Hospital.

1899                Eric Alfred Blake Pritchard is born.

1899                Fergus Ferguson is born (biography here).

1900                William Esmond Rees is born.

1900                The Danish Neurological Society is founded.

1900                Macdonald Critchley is born (biography here).

1903                Edward Graeme Robertson is born.

1903                Hugh Gregory Garland is born.

1903                William Ritchie Russell is born.

1903                Bertram Louis Abrahams is appointed assistant physician to the Westminster Hospital, where he lectures in physiology and medicine.

1904                William Osler becomes Regius Professor of Medicine at Oxford.

1904                John St. Clair Elkington is born.

1905                Samuel Nevin is born.

1905                Thomas Grainger Stewart and Gordon Holmes publish their landmark paper, ‘Symptomatology of Cerebellar Tumours’.

1906                Charles Sherrington publishes The Integrative Action of the Nervous System.

1907                St Mary’s Teaching Hospital founds a Department of Neurology.

1907                Leonard Guthrie publishes Functional Nervous Disorders of Children.

1907                The Swedish Neurological Society is founded.

1907                The Royal Society of Medicine is formed and the Section of Neurology is created out of the Neurological Society of the United Kingdom, which subsequently disbands.

1907                Charles Beevor publishes “his most important research” on the arterial supply to all parts of the brain, filling a gap in “contemporary knowledge”. This comes out in Philosophical Transaction of the Royal Society.

1908                Paul Harmer Sandifer is born.

1908                Charles Beevor dies.

1908                Bertram Louis Abrahams dies.

1908                William Aldren Turner is promoted to Physician in charge of Neurological Cases and becomes Lecturer in Neurology in King’s Medical School.

1909                The Amsterdam Neurological Society is founded, and the Swiss Neurological Society also is founded.

1909                The Neurological Institute of New York is founded.

1910                Robert Porter is born. Evidence suggests that he never becomes a member of the Association of British Neurologists, despite building a new department of neurology at the Central Middlesex Hospital from 1947 until 1962. He is not listed as a member of the Neurological Section of the Royal Society of Medicine.

1910                Joseph Shaw Bolton becomes Director of the West Riding Mental Hospital.

1910                William Aldren Turner and Thomas Grainger Stewart publish Textbook of Nervous Diseases.

1910                Thomas Barlow is elected President of the Royal College of Physicians.

1911                Hughlings Jackson dies.

1911                Joseph Shaw Bolton is appointed to the Chair of Mental Diseases at the University of Leeds.

1912                Samuel Alexander Kinnear Wilson describes progressive lenticular degeneration which becomes eponymously known as ‘Wilson’s disease.’

1912                Hugh Kerr Anderson becomes Master of Caius College, Cambridge.

1912                A special department for Diseases of the Nervous System is established at the Middlesex Hospital Medical School with H Campbell Thomson in charge.

1912                Judson Bury publishes Diseases of the Nervous System.

1913                Thomas Barlow is elected President of the International Medical Congress.

1913                Henry Miller is born.              

1913                The Mental Deficiency Act is passed into law.

1914                The Medical Research Committee is formed.

1914                The First World War begins.

1914                Joseph Shaw Bolton publishes an important but largely ignored work The Brain in Health and Disease.

1914                R. MacNab Marshall is appointed to the Victorian Infirmary, Glasgow, as a Physician for Diseases of the Nervous System.

1915                Henry Charlton Bastian dies.

1915                The West End Hospital for Diseases of the Nervous System, Paralysis, and Epilepsy becomes The West End Hospital for Nervous Diseases.

1915                Francis Walshe is appointed Major, RAMC. He is wrongly remembered as a consultant neurologist in the Army; however, the British military never officially recognizes neurology as a specialty – this from his letters.

1915                William Gowers dies.

1917                John Stanton is born.

1918                The First World War ends.

1918                Leonard Guthrie dies.

1919                Samuel Alexander Kinnier Wilson is appointed Neurologist at King’s College Hospital.

1919                William Osler dies and is remembered as the greatest personality in the medical world at the time of his death and on both sides of the ocean.

1919                Charles Ballance publishes a monograph titled, Essays on the Surgery of the Brain.

1920                The Norwegian Neurological Society is founded.

1920                Thomas Graham Brown becomes Professor of Physiology at the Welsh National School of Medicine.

1920                Charles Symonds is appointed physician in nervous diseases to Guy’s Hospital in the clinic established by Sir Arthur Hurst.

1920                Samuel Alexander Kinnier Wilson becomes editor of resurrected Edinburgh Review of    
                        Neurology and Psychiatry, and renames it the Journal of Neurology and  
                        Psychopathology.

1921                Edward Farquhar Buzzard and J G Greenfield published Pathology of the Nervous System.

1921                Edwin Bramwell reports making £5000 from his practice alone.

1922                Edwin Bramwell becomes Professor of Medicine at Edinburgh University after receiving the Moncrieff-Arnot Chair of Medicine there.

1922                Price publishes a handbook of medicine, and asks James Collier and William John Adie to the author the chapter on diseases of the nervous system. Critchley recalled that students (himself included) would buy the book, tear out the pages devoted to neurology, tenderly bind them, and discard the rest of the volume.

1923                William Gifford Wyllie becomes Medical Registrar and Pathologist at Great Ormond Street Hospital, which places him in position to become one of the countries first paediatric neurologists.

1923                Frederick Golla becomes Director of the Central Pathological Laboratory at Maudsley Hospital.

1923                Anthony Feiling becomes Assistant Physician at St George’s. From this period onwards, he co-presides over the open neurological demonstration clinic there with James Collier.

1924                Edward Farquhar Buzzard becomes Physician Extraordinary to the King.

1924                Thomas Grainger Stewart becomes a full physician at the National Hospital.

1925                The Association of Physicians meets in Edinburgh, where Byrom Bramwell is presented with a portrait.

1926                National Hospital, Queen Square is renamed the National Hospital for the Relief and Cure of Diseases of the Nervous System including Paralysis and Epilepsy.

1926                Francis Carmichael Purser is given the “complementary post” of honorary professor in neurology, Dublin University.

1926                Anthony Feiling becomes Dean of St George’s Medical School.

1926                Joseph Shaw Bolton publishes a polemic against the Freudian school of psychiatry entitled Myth of the Unconscious Mind.

1926                Ronald Grey Gordon publishes Personality.

1926                Hugh Kerr Anderson enters into negotiations with the Rockefeller Foundation, which lead to a gift of £700,000 towards the construction of new University Library and facilities for biological research at Cambridge.

1927                Edwin Bramwell becomes President of the Neurological Section of the Royal Society of Medicine.

1927                Ronald Grey Gordon publishes Neurotic Personality.

1927                George Hall is appointed Physician, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle where his “interests are mainly neurological”.

1928                Hugh Kerr Anderson dies.
1928                David Ferrier dies.

1928                Samuel Alexander Kinnear Wilson publishes Modern Problems in Neurology.

1928                Edward Farquhar Buzzard becomes Regius Professor of Medicine at
Oxford.

1928                James Birley succeeds Farquhar Buzzard as Director of the neurological department at St Thomas’ Hospital.

1928                Dorothy Russell spends a year in Boston and works with Frank Mallory.

1928                William Aldren Turner retires from King’s College Hospital, and is appointed Consulting Physician to the Hospital and Emeritus Lecturer on Neurology in the Medical School.

1928                Macdonald Critchley is appointed to King’s College Hospital staff in Neurology.

1929                The Ferrier Prize in Neurology is established at King’s in 1929 by his friends and colleagues to commemorate his life and work. The prize was worth £20 and included a bronze medal.

1929                The Local Government Act is passed into law.

1929                Donald Armour is elected President of the Neurological Section of the Royal Society of Medicine.

1929                Dorothy Russell spends a year in Montreal at the Neurological Institute, and works with Wilder Penfield.

1929                Fletcher Beach dies.

1929                The Ferrier Prize in Neurology is established at King’s College, and awarded £20 and bronze medal to its winner.

1930                Douglas McAlpine receives patronage through his father and creates an inpatient neurological clinic at Middlesex Hospital.

1930                The Poor Law and Mental Treatment Acts are passed into law.

c. 1930            Eric Alfred Blake Pritchard becomes a Physician at University College Hospital and the National Hospital for Nervous Diseases.

1931                Byrom Bramwell dies.

1931                Frederick Nattrass publishes a textbook titled: The Commoner Nervous Diseases.

1931                Arthur Stanley Barnes becomes Dean of the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Birmingham.

1932                First meeting of the Association of British Neurologists.

1932                Edgar Adrian and Charles Sherrington share the Nobel Prize in Physiology.

1932                John St. Clair Elkington is appointed neurologist to St Thomas’s Hospital.

1933                Association of British Neurologists hold their inaugural general meeting at the Medical Society of London. Wilfred Harris is the first President.

1933                Edward Arnold Carmichael is appointed Director of the MRC Clinical Neurological Research Unit. His appointment is on a five year basis.

1933                William Rees appointed Assistant physician, Cardiff Royal Infirmary.

1933                Dorothy Russell is appointed to the scientific staff of the Medical Research Council at London Hospital.

1933                Philip Cloake becomes a professor of medicine at Birmingham.

1933                Edwin Bramwell is elected President of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh.

c. 1933            Conrad Meredyth Hind Howell starts a neurological consultative clinic at St Bartholowmew’s Hospital. This experience convinces him of the desirability of having a neurologist on the staff when he retired in 1937, and he welcomes the appointment of Dr Denny Brown.

1934                Donald Elms Core dies.

1934                The Nottingham General Hospital establishes an Out-Patient Nerve Clinic.

1934                Francis Carmichael Purser becomes Kings Professor of the Practice of Medicine at Trinity College, Dublin.

1934                Hughlings Jackson Centenary Dinner is celebrated in London.

1934                The Polish Neurological Society is founded.

1934                Francis Carmichael Purser dies.
1935                Edward Graeme Robertson returns to Australia, where he becomes an important leader in Australian neurology.

1935                William John Adie dies.

1936                Professor Edwin Bramwell becomes President of the Association of British Neurologists.

1936                The Greek Neurological Society is founded.

1936                Anthony Feiling resigns his deanship over St George’s Medical School, which is described as unremarkable, although he does hire their first psychiatrist, Desmond Curran.

1936                Charles Alfred Ballance dies.

1936                Edward Farquhar Buzzard delivers his presidential speech to the British Medical Association in which he outlines his vision of the perfect medical school. Lord Nuffield is in the audience and subsequently helps Buzzard realize his dream with a grant of more than one million pounds to Oxford University.

1937                Derek Denny Brown is appointed as Neurologist to the Hospital at St Bartholomew’s, although there is no special department of neurology.

1937                Francis Walshe becomes Editor of Brain.

1937                The Association of British Neurologists invites the members of the Neurological Society of Amsterdam to meet with them in London.

1937                Frederick Golla is appointed to the Chair of Mental Pathology, University of London

1937                The Maida Vale Hospital changes its name to Maida Vale Hospital for Nervous Diseases (including Epilepsy and Paralysis).

1937                Samuel Alexander Kinnier Wilson dies.

1937                Edward Arnold Carmichael becomes the editor of the Journal of Neurology and Psychopathology upon the death of Kinnier Wilson, and the journal is renamed the Journal of Neurology and Psychiatry. The committee includes: G Jefferson, Aubrey Lewis, A Meyer, R A McCance, Denis Williams, E D Adrian, R G Gordon, J G Greenfield, F C Bartlett, and W Russell Brain.

1937                Samuel Nevin is appointed to King’s College as an Assistant neurologist, taking over the spot vacated by Kinnier Wilson.

1938                The Institute for the Teaching and Study of Neurology opens at the National Hospital, Queen Square.

1938                Edward Farquhar Buzzard becomes President of the Association of British Neurologists.

1938                Derek Denny Brown is appointed Neurologist at St. Bartholomew’s Hospital. His is the first official neurological appointment, although other physicians of nervous diseases such as J A Ormerod, H H Tooth, and C. M Hinds Howell have held positions there. No department of neurology is founded at the same time.

1938                William Ritchie Russell is appointed lecturer in neurology at Edinburgh University.

1939                Frederick Golla becomes Director of the Burden Neurological Institute in Bristol, where the first trials of electroconvulsive therapy are pioneered in Britain.

1939                Whyllie McKissock is appointed “Associate Neurological Surgeon” in March 1939 at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Sick Children.

1939                Fergus Ferguson is appointed Consultant neurologist to the Western Command and the Emergency Medical Services.

1939                The Second World War begins.

1939                George Riddoch is appointed heat of the E.M.S. Neurological Unit at Chase Farm Hospital.                   1939                -- also advises the E.M.S. on the organization of the Peripheral Nerve Injuries Centres                                  

1940                Henry Head dies.

1940                Samuel Alexander Kinnear Wilson’s textbook, Neurology, is published posthumously by A. N. Bruce.

1940                Francis Walshe publishes Diseases of the Nervous System.

1941                Fredrick Nattrass is appointed to the first Whole-time Chair of Medicine in Newcastle.

1941                The first leucotomy is performed in Britain at the Burden Neurological Institute.

1941                Arthur Stanley Barnes retires from his deanship of the Faculty of Medicine, University of Birmingham.

1941                John Gaylor is appointed neurologist to the Western Infirmary, Glasgow.

c.1941             Samuel Nevin becomes Director of the Research Laboratory at the Institute of Psychiatry, Maudsley Hospital.

1943                Edward Farquhar Buzzard resigns as Regius Professor of Medicine at Oxford.

1944                The Journal of Neurology and Psychiatry changes its name to the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry.

1944                Judson Sykes Bury dies.

1945                The Second World War ends.

1945                Stanley Barnes is elected President of the Association of British Neurologists.

1945                Edward Farquhar Buzzard dies.

1945                Helen Dimsdale and Dorothy Russell are elected to the Association of British Neurologists. Helen Dimsdale eventually becomes treasurer.

1946                St Bartholomew’s appoints Dr J W Aldren Turner Neurologist to the Hospital and creates a department with beds for him.

1946                Hugh Garland founds and becomes Physician in Charge of Neurological Department at Leeds General Infirmary.

1946                Dr J W Aldren Turner is appointed Neurologist to St. Bartholomew’s Hospital in a Special Department of Neurology and he is given a small number of beds.

1946                Francis Walshe is elected to the Royal Society.

1946                Philip Cloak resigns his chair of medicine, and takes a part-time Personal Chair in neurology at Birmingham. He tries to create a tripartite academic division of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry but fails.

1946                Dorothy Russell becomes Professor of Morbid Anatomy at London Hospital, and becomes Director of the Bernhard Baron Institute of Pathology. She is the first woman in the Western World to head a department of pathology.

1946                Gordon Holmes is elected President of the Association of British Neurologists and resigns his post as Secretary.

1946                Macdonald Critchley becomes Secretary of the Association of British Neurologists.

1947                Robert Porter is appointed Physician with a special interest in Neurology at the Central Middlesex Hospital. When he answers a questionnaire from the Neurology Committee of the Royal College of Physicians in the early 1960s, he identifies himself as a general physician working in neurology there.

1947                Alan Barham Carter becomes a Consultant physician in Ashford, where he works as a general physician with an interest in neurology for the next thirty-one years.

1947                Thomas Graham Brown retires from the Chair of Physiology at the Welsh National School of Medicine.

1947                George Riddoch dies.

1947                Maida Vale and the National Hospital merge but with the result that really Queen Square becomes the dominant London hospital for neurology.

1948                Hugh Garland becomes consultant neurologist to the Leeds Regional Hospital Board.

1948                Francis Walshe publishes Critical Studies in Neurology.

1948                Edgar Adrian is elected President of the Association of British Neurologists.

1948                Neurosurgical unit is created in Aberdeen.

1948                William Ritchie Russell becomes the editor of the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry.

1948                Martin Nichols becomes the first neurosurgeon appointed at the Aberdeen Royal Infirmary.

1948                The Canadian Neurological Society is founded.

1948                The American Academy of Neurology is founded.

1948                William Rees appointment as Consultant physician is changed to Consultant neurologist at Swansea General Hospital, Morriston Hospital, and Neath Hospital – all positions he holds until 1967.

1949                Hugh Garland becomes Editor of the Leeds University Medical Journal.

1950                The Institute of Neurology – an amalgamation of the National and Maida Vale Hospitals for Nervous Diseases – affiliates with the University of London.

1950                The National Institute for Neurological Diseases and Blindness is founded in the United States because of Public Law 692.

1950                Francis Walshe is elected President of the Association of British Neurologists.

1950                Edward Graeme Roberts (and several Australian neurologists) form the Australian Association of Neurologists. It seems clear that this Association was modeled on the Association of British Neurologists.

1950                Ronald Grey Gordon dies.

1951                John Stanton is appointed Senior Registrar in Psychiatry at Newcastle upon Tyne working under Alexander Kennedy. Kennedy hires the neurologically minded Stanton because of a desire to make psychiatry more organic in its focus. Stanton’s subsequent years are marked by a neuropsychiatric outlook typical to Newcastle, even though he moves to Edinburgh in 1953.

1951                Frederick Nattrass writes a chapter titled “Diseases of the Nervous System” which appears in Chamberlain’s Textbook of Medicine.

c.1951             Samuel Nevin introduces the electron microscope to British neurology.

1952                Edwin Bramwell dies.

1952                Francis Walshe becomes President of the Royal Society of Medicine.

1952                Arthur Stanley Barnes publishes a History of the Birmingham Medical Centre.

1952                J G Greenfield is elected President of the Association of British Neurologists.

1952                Macdonald Critchley resigns as Secretary of the Association of British Neurologists.

1952                Edward Arnold Carmichael becomes Secretary of the Association of British Neurologists.

1953                Great Ormond Street Hospital for Sick Children establishes a Department of Neurology headed up by Paul Sandifer. Paul Sandifer thus becomes the first institutionally recognized pediatric neurologist in Britain.

1953                Francis Walshe resigns as Editor of Brain.

1953                Western General Hospital creates a Neurology Unit at the Northern General Hospital alongside Respiratory Medicine and Rheumatology. John Marshall heads the unit.

1954                Anthony Feiling is elected President of the Association of British Neurologists.

1955                Charles Symonds retires from the neurology department of Guy’s Hospital.

1955                Hugh Garland retires as Editor of the Leeds University Medical Journal.

1955                Denis Williams becomes Secretary of the Association of British Neurologists.

1955                Dr Giuseepe Pampiglione is appointed as the first Neurophysiologist to Great Ormond Street Hospital for Sick Children.

1955                George Hall dies.

1956                Charles Symonds is elected President of the Association of British Neurologists.

1957                Thomas Grainger Stewart dies.

1958                Professor F J Nattrass is elected President of the Association of British Neurologists.

1958                Henry Miller establishes a new department of neurology at Newcastle.

1959                Dorothy Russell publishes Pathology of Tumors of the Nervous System.

1960                W Russell Brain is elected President of the Association of British Neurologists.

1960                William Gooddy becomes Secretary of the Association of British Neurologists.

1960                Dorothy Russell become Emeritus Professor.

1961                Henry Miller becomes Reader in Neurology, Royal Victoria Infirmary and University of Newcastle.

1961                Helen Dimsdale becomes treasurer of the Association of British Neurologists.

1962                Macdonald Critchley becomes President of the Association of British Neurologists.

1962                Eric Alfred Blake Pritchard dies.

1963                John St. Clair Elkington dies.

1964                Henry Miller becomes Professor of Neurology, Royal Victoria Infirmary and University of Newcastle.

1964                R A Henson becomes Secretary of the Association of British Neurologists.

1964                Fergus Ferguson is elected President of the Association of British Neurologists.

1965                Francis Walshe publishes Further Critical Studies in Neurology.

1965                The first specialist neurological post in Aberdeen is created, although a neurosurgical unit has existed there since 1948.

1965                John A Simpson becomes the First Professor of Neurology at the University of Glasgow.

1965                Alan Downie becomes the first Consultant neurologist in the Aberdeen Royal Infirmary.

1965                Thomas Graham Brown dies.

1966                R S Allison is elected President of the Association of British Neurologists.

1966                Henry Miller becomes Vice-Chancellor, University of Newcastle.

1966                William Ritchie Russell is appointed to the first chair of neurology at Oxford.

1966                Helen Dimsdale resigns as Treasurer of the Association of British Neurologists.

1967                Hugh Garland dies at the age of 64.

1968                Graham Wakefield becomes the first consultant neurologist appointed at the Royal United Hospital in Bath. He initially engages in general medical work, but eventually concentrates on adult neurological service.

1968                Frederick Golla dies.
1968                W Ritchie Russell is elected President of the Association of British Neurologists.

1969                William Gifford Wyllie dies.

1969                Philip Cloake dies.

1969                Robert Porter dies.

1970                The collected papers of Charles Symonds are published as Studies in Neurology, which was subsequently reviewed by the Times Literary Supplement.

1970                Samuel Nevin is elected President of the Association of British Neurologists.

1970                John Bernard Stanton dies at the young age of 51.

1973                Francis M. R. Walshe dies.

1974                Fergus Ferguson dies.

1975                Edward Graeme Robertson dies in Australia.

1975                Anthony Feiling dies.

1976                Henry Miller dies.

1978                Charles Symonds dies.

1979                Frederick Nattrass dies.

1979                Samuel Nevin dies.

1980                William Ritchie Russell dies.

1983                Dorothy Russell dies.

1987                Dr Graham Wakefield retires from Royal United Hospital, Bath.

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